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Wai Ting Siok, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor/Research, Department of Linguistics
Principal Investigator, State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences

B.Soc.Sc. - University of Hong Kong, 1992, Psychology and Statistics
M.A. - State University of New York at Albany, 1997, Developmental and Cognitive Psychology
Ph.D. - University of Hong Kong, 2001, Psychology and Education

Dr. Siok received her Ph.D. in Psychology and Education from the University of Hong Kong's Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences in 2001. After a two-year postdoctoral training at Stanford University Psychology Department and the Stanford Institute of Reading and Learning, Dr. Siok began her work in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hong Kong in 2004. Dr. Siok's research focuses on bilingualism, language development and language neuroscience. Dr. Siok's ongoing research is aimed at determining the neural mechanisms that underlie reading in normal and dyslexic children.

Publications:

  1. Tan, L. H., Hoosain, R., & Siok, W. W. T. (1995). Activation of phonological codes before access to character meaning in written Chinese. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 22, 865-882.
  2. Feldman, L. B., & Siok, W. W. T. (1997). The role of component function in visual recognition of Chinese characters. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 23, 776-781.
  3. Feldman, L. B., & Siok, W. W. T. (1999). Semantic radicals contribute to the visual identification of Chinese characters. Journal of Memory & Language, 40, 559-576.
  4. Feldman, L. B., & Siok, W. W. T. (1999). Semantic radicals in phonetic compounds: Implications for visual character recognition in Chinese. In J. Wang, A. W. Inhoff, & H. C. Chen (Eds.), Reading Chinese script: A cognitive analysis (pp. 19-35). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  5. Siok, W. T., & Fletcher, P. (2001). The role of phonological awareness and visual-orthographic skills in Chinese reading acquisition. Developmental Psychology, 37, 886-899.
  6. Siok, W. T., Jin, Z., Fletcher, P., & Tan, L. H. (2003). Distinct brain regions associated with syllable and phoneme. Human Brain Mapping, 18, 201-207.
  7. Tan, L. H., Spinks, J. A., Feng, C. M., Siok, W. T., Perfetti, C. A., Xiong, J., Fox, P. T., & Gao, J. H. (2003). Neural systems of second language reading are shaped by native language. Human Brain Mapping, 18, 158-166.
  8. Siok, W. T., Perfetti, C. A., Jin, Z., & Tan, L. H. (2004). Biological abnormality of impaired reading constrained by culture: Evidence from Chinese. Nature, 431, 71-76.
  9. Deutsch, G. K., Dougherty, R. F., Bammer, R., Siok, W. T., Gabrieli, J. D. E., & Wandell, B. (2005). Children's reading performance is correlated with white matter structure measured by diffusion tensor imaging. Cortex, 41, 3, 354-363.
  10. Tan, L. H., Spinks, J. A., Eden, G., Perfetti, C. A., & Siok, W. T. (2005). Reading depends on writing, in Chinese. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102, 8781-8785.
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