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Xiong Jiang, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Neuroscience

Ph.D. -- The Catholic University of America, 2005

Dr. Jiang received his Ph.D. from the Catholic University of America in 2005. He is currently a research assistant professor at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, DC. Dr. Jiang uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), psychophysics, and computational modeling to study high-level cognitive functions in both young and old, with a focus on object recognition recently. Using the technique of fMRI-rapid adaptation, he has been studying invariance and selectivity, two key issues of object recognition. In particular, he is interested in the relationship between behavior and neural selectivity in the brain, especially, how the change in behavioral performance can be quantitatively, rather than qualitatively, linked to the change in neural selectivity that might be caused by neural disorders, aging, and training.

Selected Publications:

  1. Purecell, J.J., Jiang, X., & Eden, G.F. (2016) Shared orthographic neuronal representations for spelling and reading. Neuroimage, 147: 554-567. PMID: 28011250.
  2. Glezer, L.S., Jiang, X., & Riesenhuber, M. (2009) fMRI-RA evidence for a neural representation in the "Visual Word Form Area" based on wholewords. Neuron, 62(2), 199-204.
  3. Jiang, X., Bradley, E., Rini, R.A., Zeffiro, T., VanMeter, J.,& Riesenhuber, M. (2007). Categorization Training results in shape- and category-selective human neural plasticity. Neuron, 53(6), 891-903.
  4. Jiang, X., Rosen, E., Zeffiro, T., VanMeter, J., Blanz, V.,& Riesenhuber, M. (2006). Evaluation of a shape-based model of human face discrimination using fMRI and behavioral techniques. Neuron, 50(1), 159-172.
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