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ADHD Information Packet Online

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common developmental disorder that is treated primarily with stimulant medication. We do not fully understand the nature of cognitive deficits associated with ADHD, their cause, and why stimulant medication is beneficial for ADHD.

    Our research is aimed at furthering our understanding of the disorder in terms of cognitive functions and their underpinnings in the brain. We use two methods in our studies, behavioral and functional brain imaging.

    Our behavioral studies compare children with ADHD and healthy children on a variety of attentional functions. In these experiments, children are seated in front of a computer and play games that are designed to elucidate some aspect of their attentional function. Further, in an attempt to better understand the action of stimulant medication, we also compare ADHD children's performance on these games with and without their regularly prescribed medication.

    Our brain imaging studies involve functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), a non-invasive imaging technique which makes it possible to look at your brain while it is engaged in a task, such as playing a game that requires attention. There are no drugs or injections. fMRI works by measuring naturally occurring changes in blood flow in the brain.  In these studies, we take pictures of the child's brain while they are performing attentional tasks. We compare brain function in ADHD and healthy children, and also in ADHD children with and without regularly prescribed medication.

    Our studies are conducted at Georgetown University and scheduled at a time convenient to you. You can choose to participate in both behavioral  and brain imaging studies or either. We provide parking and also a small payment as a token of our appreciation for your participation in the study. Upon completion of the study, we will share our results with you. Our results will not affect the current treatment of your child but in the long run, will lead to a better understanding of the disorder that may improve diagnosis and treatment in the future.

Sincerely,

Chandan Vaidya, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Psychology, Georgetown University

Assistant Research Professor of Pediatrics, Children's National Medical Center


Selective effects of methylphenidate in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A functional magnetic resonance study, Neurobiology, 1998

Searching for a neurobiological signature of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Molecular Psychology, 1999

Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD)

    - Where We Stand: Access to Medication as a Component of Multi-Modal Treatment

Eight Principles to Guide ADHD Children, The ADHD Report, 1993

Concerta (Once a Day treatment option)

How College Students with Learning Disabilities Can Advocate for Themselves, LDA Newsbriefs, 1997

Findings from the NIMH Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (MTA): Implications and Applications for Primary Care Providers, JDBP, 2001

National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities

    - Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Briefing Paper)

A New Choice for Treating ADHD, Washington Post, 2003

Teacher Knowledge of Stimulant Medication and ADHD, Remedial and Special Education, 2003

Who Can Diagnose LD and/or ADHD?, LDonline, 2003

"AD/HD: An Overview" By SchwabLearning.org. Read this article at: http://www.schwablearning.org/articles.aspx?r=26

Other Information:

What is ADHD?

Parent Information Sheet on Stimulant Drugs

Sample Medication Worksheet

References to ADHD Books

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